Research project to develop mental health first aid guidelines

Aug 20, 2015

Are you an experienced manager, workplace health professional or consumer advocate? Could you spare a few hours to contribute to an expert panel?

Researchers from the University of Melbourne, Deakin University and the University of Tasmania, in partnership with Mental Health First Aid Australia, are seeking individuals for an expert panel as part of a research project. The project will develop guidelines for workplaces on providing mental health first aid to employees and co-workers.

To take part, you'll need to be 18 or over, live in Australia, Canada, Ireland, New Zealand, the UK or the USA, and have an expert level of knowledge about workplace mental health through your experience as:

  • a manager (for at least five years) or 
  • workplace mental health or workplace health professional (for example within human resources or workplace health and safety) or
  • as a mental health consumer advocate.

The total time commitment for this project is estimated to be approximately two to three hours. You are not required to attend any meetings, as all contact will be online, or if you prefer, by paper mail. 

Once developed, these guidelines will provide guidance for workplaces on giving appropriate support to an employee who is developing a mental health problem or experiencing a mental health crisis. The guidelines will be freely available to download from the Mental Health First Aid website 

Find out more

The project is being conducted by Nataly Bovopoulos to fulfil the requirements of a Doctor of Philosophy under the supervision of Prof Tony Jorm, A/Prof Tony LaMontagne and A/Prof Angela Martin. If you would like to express interest in participating in this research, please contact Nataly Bovopoulos via email or call +61 412 205 860. 

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